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LGBT-Travel-Olympics

LGBT Travelers Could Face Risks During 2016 Olympics In Brazil

In Rio de Janeiro, the primary location for the majority of the 2016 Olympics events, LGBT travelers are likely to be safest in areas with a high concentration of LGBT venues and in mid- to upper-class neighborhoods but should maintain a low profile if attending the Olympic events or visiting parts of Rio other than areas along the southern beaches.

US: Republican and Democratic National Conventions Prompt Heightened Security Measures amid Potentially Disruptive Protests

The 2016 Republican National Convention (RNC), to be held in Cleveland, Ohio from July 18-21, and the Democratic National Convention (DNC), to be held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from July 25-28, have the potential to be controversial and disruptive events. Both of the conventions are designated as National Special Security Events (NSSEs), meaning they could become targets of international/domestic terrorism or other criminal activity.

Challenges for Transgender International Travelers

After a series of high-profile incidents between Transportation Security Agency (TSA) agents and transgender travelers in mid-2015, LGBT rights organizations and travelers report that security processing during domestic travel has become less fraught. However, the way security personnel at airports outside the US treat transgender individuals is inconsistent, leading to situations where transgender international travelers still face insensitivity and confusion, such incidents can be emotionally difficult and disruptive to travel.

A Cidade Maravilhosa: Will the Olympic Games live up to Rio de Janeiro's nickname?

Rio de Janeiro’s nickname, the Marvelous City, is coming under fire as the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games approach. On June 17, Rio de Janeiro State Interim Governor Francisco Dornelles did the improbable: declared an economic state of emergency with just 49 days until opening ceremonies. Fearing a “total collapse” of the public security, transportation, health, and education infrastructure, Dornelles essentially filed for a state’s version of bankruptcy. To avoid possible strikes and protests that could disrupt the Games, the federal government was forced to step in and provide BRL 2.9 billion (USD 868 million) to the state.

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